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The role and place of ECEC in integrated working, benefitting vulnerable groups such as Roma

The NESET report examines the added value provided by, and the prerequisites for, integrated working – as well as the crucial role, played by early childhood education and care (ECEC) services – in order to better serve all children and families, but especially the most vulnerable.

Extra attention is devoted to Roma children and their families as one of the most vulnerable groups in Europe, often trapped in a vicious circle of poverty, exclusion, and discrimination.

The report is written for policy makers and professionals working in the field of early childhood education and care. It is guided by the following questions:

  • What services or functions should be involved in integrated working, paying specific attention to the role that ECEC can play?
  • What inspiring examples of integrated working already exist in Europe?
  • What is the added value of integrated working (for children and families, for professionals, for policy makers) in general, and specifically for Roma?
  • What are the prerequisites for integrated working in general, and specifically for integrated working aimed at addressing the needs of Roma?

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Case studies on curriculum, pedagogy, and school climate interventions tackling inequalities

In this report, researchers present and discuss the findings of seven in-depth case studies of curriculum, pedagogy, and/or social climate interventions currently ongoing in seven European countries, from distinct geographic regions, diverse in their income levels, research traditions, education and welfare systems, and immigrant integration policies: England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and Portugal.

Specifically, they conducted an inventory of promising interventions, within the classroom and school microsystems, aiming to promote educational equality and belongingness in immigrant, Roma, and low-income children attending early childhood and primary education provision in the Czech Republic, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and Portugal.

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Closing the life expectancy gap of Roma in Europe

A report by the European Public Health Alliance (EPHA) focuses on how socioeconomic preconditions affect the health of Roma in Europe. Infant mortality is reported to be between two to three times higher than majority population.

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One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia

One in a hundred Roma makes it to University, why is that? The study One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia, is a collaboration between the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University (Harvard FXB) and the CIP Center for Interactive Pedagogy in Belgrade. The research goes beyond the scrutiny of educational deficits and obstacles to find out what actually works.

Researchers studied the responses from surveys, interviews, and a “Writing Romani Lives” workshop conducted with 89 Romani adolescents who made it to college and 100 who did not. The findings showed that strong teacher and peer support systems, access to early childhood development services, and a high level of education among immediate family members corresponded to educational success.

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TOY for Inclusion: project results

In 2018, TOY for Inclusion has opened eight Play Hubs in seven European countries: one in Belgium, Croatia, Latvia, Hungary, Slovakia, Slovenia and two in Italy.

Thanks to the work of local communities and professionals, the TOY for Inclusion Play Hubs provide opportunities for children and adults, Roma and non-Roma, to integrate and develop.

The project has been successful in fostering social inclusion for Romani young children and families, enhancing social cohesion and easing out the transition to primary school.

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Parental involvement in reading activities in Roma and non-Roma families

In a recent study conducted in the scope of ISOTIS, in Portugal, Roma families and non-Roma families experiencing financial hardship, with 3 to 6 year-old children, were interviewed about the frequency of reading activities involving adults and children at their home.

Findings indicated that the frequency of adult-child reading activities at home can be potentiated by reinforcing Roma families’ educational aspirations for their children, and by creating opportunities for positive social interactions between parents in the preschool setting, particularly for families experiencing financial hardship. A poster of the study is available.

 

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Roma Health Report: data collection in the Member States of the European Union

The purpose of this report is to provide an evidence-based review of literature on Roma health, covering 2008-2013 and the following indicators:

1. Mortality and life expectancy
2. Prevalence of major infectious diseases
3. Healthy life styles and related behaviours
4. Access and use of health services and prevention programmes
5. Prevalence of major chronic diseases
6. Health factors related to the role of women in the Roma community
7. Environmental and other socio-economic factors

The methodology used was based on two steps: (i) Desk Research based on the review of secondary data (a literature review); and (ii) Fieldwork collecting primary data through semi-structured interviews.

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