Knowledge Hub

FAQs – TOY for Inclusion

This document addresses key questions from various stakeholders about the TOY for Inclusion approach. Frequently asked questions such as the following are addressed in this document:

  • What is a Play Hub?
  • How do children benefit from Play Hubs?
  • How do parents and caregivers and other family members benefit from Play Hubs?
  • How much does it cost to run a Play Hub?

 

Download Resource

TOY for Inclusion – Voices of Children

Social inclusion begins with young children’s eagerness to play together.

TOY for Inclusion Play Hubs offer inclusive spaces where children and families from different backgrounds are encouraged to play and learn: Children are allowed to borrow toys, parents can gather information about their child’s development and individuals of all ages are given space to come together.

Download the booklet, which shares the stories told by the children attending these Play Hubs.

Download Resource

NESET report on integration of Roma citizens in Spain

The network of experts working on the social dimension of education and training (NESET) has recently published an ad hoc report titled ‘Overview of the integration of Roma citizens in Spain and some transferable lessons for the EU’.

The new report, prepared by Silvia Carrasco Pons and Gabriela Poblet Denti, provides an overview of the social integration of Roma in Spain, evidence on the progress made, effective policies and approaches within the areas of employment, education, housing and health.

Download Resource

Providing Quality Early Childhood Education and Care: Results from the Starting Strong Survey 2018

For most children, early childhood education and care (ECEC) provides the first experience of life in a group away from their families. This experience plays a crucial role in children’s learning, development and well-being. The benefits of high-quality ECEC are not restricted to children’s first years of life. However, little is known about this first experience. What do children learn and do in ECEC settings? With which staff do children interact at their centres? Do all children face the same opportunities to enrol in high-quality settings? What are the main spending priorities to raise the quality of ECEC? These are key questions for parents, staff and policy makers.

The OECD Starting Strong Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS Starting Strong) is the first international survey that focuses on the ECEC workforce. It offers an opportunity to learn about the characteristics of the workforce, the practices they use with children, their beliefs about children’s development and their views on the profession and on the sector. This first volume of findings, Providing Quality Early Childhood Education and Care, examines multiple factors that can affect the quality of ECEC and thereby can influence children’s learning, development and well-being.

View Resource

Inclusive Early Childhood Education Environment Self-Reflection Tool

This tool is intended to help improve settings’ inclusiveness and can be used by all professionals and staff to reflect on their setting’s inclusiveness, focusing on the social, learning and physical environment.

The tool was developed as part of the Inclusive Early Childhood Education (IECE) project, conducted by the European Agency for Special Needs and Inclusive Education from 2015 to 2017 . The project’s overall goal was to identify, analyze and subsequently promote the main characteristics of quality IECE for all children.

Download on the Agency’s website in 26 languages.

Download Resource

Balkan Barometer 2019

The Balkan Barometer is an annual survey of regional perceptions and attitudes across a wide array of social, political and economic factors impacting life in South East Europe (SEE). It includes comparable data on pre-primary education in different countries of the region.

Download Resource