Knowledge Hub

Global Survey of Inclusive Early Childhood Development and Early Childhood Intervention Programs

The RISE Institute hosted the global online survey and worked jointly with UNICEF and the ECD Task Force (ECDtf) of the Global Partnership on Children with Disabilities (GPcwd) to create and distribute it in English, French, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish. This large survey was designed in 2016, was conducted in 2017, and the report was prepared in 2018.

The main objectives of the survey were to:

  • Map current implementation of IECD and ECI programs and related activities;
  • Describe key IECD and ECI program features;
  • Identify gaps and challenges in providing accessible Inclusive Early Childhood Development (IECD) and Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) services;
  • Document factors associated with successful implementation and scale-up; and
  • Generate recommendations to inform future policy and program development andnational planning and implementation efforts.

The online survey targeted a range of programs, and activities including IECD and ECI services; rehabilitation and habilitation services; humanitarian, emergency, and child protection services; advocacy campaigns; and research and evaluation projects. The survey solicited a broad range of information from respondents including implementing sectors, scope and geographic focus of program, target population, policy support, and program approach and objectives. Respondents also provided information on screening and referral services; program contents and characteristics; barriers to program development, expansion, demand, and quality; factors that enhanced program success; and information on program funding.

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A world ready to learn: prioritizing quality early childhood education

UNICEF’s global report on pre-primary education presents a comprehensive analysis of the status of early childhood education worldwide. It contains interesting facts and figures on Romani children.
It also outlines a set of practical recommendations for governments and partners to make quality pre-primary education universal and routine. Noting that at least 175 million children – 50 per cent of the world’s pre-primary-age population – are not enrolled in pre-primary programmes, the report urges governments to commit at least 10 per cent of their national education budgets to scale them up. Such funding should be invested in pre-primary teachers, quality standards and equitable expansion, the report states.

 

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Mapping of research on Roma children in the European Union

This report addresses the acknowledged scarcity of quality, disaggregated, child focused data on Roma children which is widely seen to impede the development of positive policies and programmes promoting full realisation of their rights.

The countries that were selected for mapping on the basis of their estimated Roma population and their capacity to benefit from Roma related research included Albania; Belgium; Bosnia and Herzegovina; Bulgaria; the Czech Republic; France; Germany; Greece; Hungary; Ireland; Italy; Kosovo; Netherlands; Romania; Serbia; Slovakia and Spain. Seventy-four research areas were identified, divided into nine thematic areas – child protection; civil registration; discrimination; education; employment; health; housing; migration; and social protection.

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The role and place of ECEC in integrated working, benefitting vulnerable groups such as Roma

The NESET report examines the added value provided by, and the prerequisites for, integrated working – as well as the crucial role, played by early childhood education and care (ECEC) services – in order to better serve all children and families, but especially the most vulnerable.

Extra attention is devoted to Roma children and their families as one of the most vulnerable groups in Europe, often trapped in a vicious circle of poverty, exclusion, and discrimination.

The report is written for policy makers and professionals working in the field of early childhood education and care. It is guided by the following questions:

  • What services or functions should be involved in integrated working, paying specific attention to the role that ECEC can play?
  • What inspiring examples of integrated working already exist in Europe?
  • What is the added value of integrated working (for children and families, for professionals, for policy makers) in general, and specifically for Roma?
  • What are the prerequisites for integrated working in general, and specifically for integrated working aimed at addressing the needs of Roma?

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Case studies on curriculum, pedagogy, and school climate interventions tackling inequalities

In this report, researchers present and discuss the findings of seven in-depth case studies of curriculum, pedagogy, and/or social climate interventions currently ongoing in seven European countries, from distinct geographic regions, diverse in their income levels, research traditions, education and welfare systems, and immigrant integration policies: England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and Portugal.

Specifically, they conducted an inventory of promising interventions, within the classroom and school microsystems, aiming to promote educational equality and belongingness in immigrant, Roma, and low-income children attending early childhood and primary education provision in the Czech Republic, England, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, and Portugal.

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Closing the life expectancy gap of Roma in Europe

A report by the European Public Health Alliance (EPHA) focuses on how socioeconomic preconditions affect the health of Roma in Europe. Infant mortality is reported to be between two to three times higher than majority population.

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One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia

One in a hundred Roma makes it to University, why is that? The study One in One Hundred: Drivers of Success and Resilience among College-Educated Romani Adolescents in Serbia, is a collaboration between the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights at Harvard University (Harvard FXB) and the CIP Center for Interactive Pedagogy in Belgrade. The research goes beyond the scrutiny of educational deficits and obstacles to find out what actually works.

Researchers studied the responses from surveys, interviews, and a “Writing Romani Lives” workshop conducted with 89 Romani adolescents who made it to college and 100 who did not. The findings showed that strong teacher and peer support systems, access to early childhood development services, and a high level of education among immediate family members corresponded to educational success.

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