News

Breaking the silence: a month of raising awareness about the status of young Roma children in Europe

The REYN Study unveils a critical truth: young Roma children across Europe grapple with challenges that touch every facet of their lives – social, physical, cognitive, and emotional well-being. It is a story that needs to be told, and we’re committed to bringing it to the forefront.

In a powerful move to amplify these voices, starting today – International Roma Day (April 8th) – and continuing every Monday in April, REYN, an initiative of the International Step by Step Association (ISSA) will unveil a series of compelling facts on different key areas that profoundly influence the development and overall well-being of Roma children.

This journey is not just ours – it’s yours too. Join us in breaking the silence and casting a spotlight on the lives of young Roma children.



Get involved, make an impact, and be a part of this vital conversation. Use our hashtags #EURomachildren, #InternationalRomaDay to connect, engage, and spread the word. Together, we can turn awareness into action for a brighter future for Roma children.










Every child deserves and has the right to grow up in an environment of safety and security. But Roma children often encounter environments marked by physical dangers and environmental risks. For example, according to data collected under REYN Study, three out of ten Roma children grow up in unsafe neighbourhoods. In addition, their parents face financial barriers and are unable to secure a more stable living situation. Four out of ten Roma families with children under six who participated in the research do not receive any kind of subsidy or similar. Evidence emphasizes the need for stronger social safety nets and financial support systems for vulnerable Roma families with young children.

Safety and security concerns arise from barriers to accessing social security or social protection, as well as growing up in neighbourhoods exposed to crime, violence, and vandalism.




Beyond the immediate challenges in their physical surroundings, Roma children also face barriers in terms of their exposure to formal, non-formal, or informal learning environments, which are crucial for their holistic development. When looking at the early learning opportunities and experiences of young Roma children, the REYN Study reveals multi-layered barriers and challenges hindering their access and full participation in ECEC services. On average, according to the data collected, 47% of young Roma children are deprived of these essential services in their neighborhoods (and 59% of children under the age of three). The disparities extend to essential public spaces like parks, playgrounds, health facilities, and cultural centers – vital amenities that can enrich a child’s learning experiences and support growth. Segregation in classrooms, cultural insensitivity, and resource deficiencies with persistent language barriers (seven out of ten Roma children do not understand the main language of instruction) all determine the quality of services, which ultimately impacts upon their academic and developmental prospects.




Research in early childhood underscores the pivotal role parents play during the formative years of their children’s lives. The REYN Study brings to the forefront the concept of responsive parenting—a key driver of emotional and cognitive growth in children. It reveals the commitment of numerous Roma parents to foster a supportive environment for their children, despite facing systemic discrimination and socio-economic challenges. A significant majority (89%) of parents consistently engage with their infants, responding through sounds, facial expressions, and gestures. However, the study also uncovers a prevalent gap in parental access to essential resources and information on child development and the critical role of play, which in turn affects their ability to practice responsive parenting effectively.



Promoting social justice and inclusion for young Roma children in Europe

Today, the World Day of Social Justice, is a day to promote social justice and address global issues such as poverty, exclusion, and discrimination.

n this occasion, we aim to highlight the struggles faced by young Roma children and their families in Europe, enduring discrimination, segregation, and social exclusion that limits their opportunities and hinders their potential.

Early childhood development plays a crucial role in establishing a strong foundation for lifelong learning and health, and stark inequalities that Roma children face in these crucial days. However, the lack of data on young Roma children impedes the development of responsive policies.

To address this gap, the REYN Early Childhood Research Study (2023) provides valuable data and insights that can inform policies and practices to improve the lives of Roma children and their communities.

Learn more about the REYN Research and join us in advocating for social justice and inclusion for Roma children and families. Together, we can make a difference and create a more just and equitable society for all. #WorldDayofSocialJustice #REYNStudy #RomaChildren

REYN Study: Stimulating data-informed decisions for young Roma children in Europe

The data collected in the research conducted by ISSA, through its REYN initiative, to analyse the situation of young Roma children and their families across 11 European countries, has led REYN to disseminate its findings urging decision-makers to include young Roma children in transformative early childhood policies and programs. The research has been developed in collaboration with researchers from the Centre of Roma Studies (CEG) at CREA – University of Barcelona.

Data on key areas impacting children’s development
By analyzing six key areas that impact the lives of young Roma children and their families (family status and living conditions, health and well-being, safety and security, early learning, responsive parenting and discrimination), the REYN Early Childhood Research Study (REYN Study) reveals the multiple challenges and barriers that young Roma children and their families face in these areas, such as poverty, social exclusion, poor health, low educational attainment, and limited access to quality services. It also highlights the strengths and resilience of Roma communities, as well as the potential of early childhood interventions to improve their outcomes and opportunities.

Informing and inspiring actions to transform the lives of young Roma children
Throughout 2023, in partnership with key stakeholders in Europe, REYN has organized several events and activities to share the study findings and stimulate decision-makers for the inclusion of young Roma children in transformative early childhood policies and programs. These include:

  • Unlocking the Potential of Young Roma Children in Europe”, a public event at the European Parliament (EP) hosted by Dr Milan Brglez, EP Member, during the Roma Week in Brussels, co-organized by REYN, the European Public Health Alliance (EPHA), Eurochild, and the Minority Initiative.
  • ISSA Connects for Learning, which featured the launch of a cross-country analysis of the REYN research. Held in Opatija, Croatia, the event was attended by REYN Nationals and ISSA Members.
  • Inclusion of Roma children in Early Childhood Education and Care”, an online event aimed at local governments and municipalities, recognizing their role in enhancing opportunities for marginalized groups at early stages, including Roma. This event was organized by Eurocities and UNICEF.

For updates or more information, subscribe to the REYN Newsletter or follow REYN on Facebook and X.

REYN Early Childhood Research Study

The European REYN Early Childhood Research Study (REYN Study) provides an examination of the status of young Roma children and their families across Europe. It offers a comprehensive understanding of the multi-layered and intersectional nature of the challenges faced by young Roma children and their families. The REYN Study presents key findings from a thorough analysis of data on key areas of the lives of young Roma children and their families. These areas include family status and living conditions, health and well-being, safety and security, early learning, responsive parenting, and discrimination.


Roma parents in Slovenia are seeing the value of early education and care

In the period between the end of 2021 and spring 2022, National REYNs conducted research in their own countries on the situation of Roma families with young children (REYN Research Study). In Slovenia, the Educational Research Institute led this unique process in the country, which implied involving members of the Roma community along the development of the study. They gathered data from Roma parents, ECEC practitioners, professionals who work with Roma families, and from local and national policy makers.

In this article, we would like to highlight some interesting information obtained through questionnaires and focus groups with Roma parents. Mothers and fathers from Prekmurje and Dolenjska, two Slovenian regions with large populations of Roma, participated in the research which examined various topics, such as health and wellbeing, hygiene and nutrition, play and early learning, responsive parenting, family and living conditions, safety and security, and accessibility, availability and affordability of ECEC services. The main focus of this piece will be on how Roma parents feel about early childhood education and care.

Through the research it became evident that Roma parents are aware of the significant impact that they have on their children in the early years. This is illustrated by one of the fathers who said, “If I were to raise my voice to my wife, the children would hear us and this is not right. What kind of a message am I sending to my children with such behaviour?”

The parents also demonstrated an awareness of the importance of being caring and attuned to their children’s needs. It is important for parents to show affection to their children through a caring attitude, talking to them, and spending quality time with them. Especially for younger children, who cannot yet express themselves verbally, it is very important that parents do their best to interact and connect with the child in order to understand what it is they need. Many parents — mainly mothers — confirmed that they had no problems understanding their children and that they had a feel for what their children wanted to tell them. “A mother just feels what the child needs,” one mother said.

The value of preschool

We often emphasize how important it is for parents to view education as a value and to enrol their children in preschool early — enabling them access to quality education and care, and a supportive learning environment.

Participants in the studies agreed that attending preschool indeed supports children’s development. They witnessed advantages in the children in their acquiring a new language, understanding the daily routine, learning about tolerance and good manners, as well as improving their independence during meals (table preparation, serving the food, cleaning the table after eating etc.), hygiene, and dressing. Additionally, parents recognised that in preschool, children are able to make new friends, and learn how to act in society. All of these skills help children have a smoother transition into school.

Another huge benefit parents in the research saw in preschool education was that it gave their children an opportunity to learn the language of the majority. This is one of the most important factors in helping children to be successful later in school. Otherwise, it is likely that they would have difficulties with understanding the teachers’ lessons, their learning outcomes would be lower, and peers might tease them. All of these things have an impact on the child’s development and level of self-esteem.

Furthermore, some parents were inspired by the amount of effort that certain teachers and peers put into helping their children feel welcome at preschool. One couple shared that, ”Our daughter could not speak Slovene, when she entered school. One boy really tried to help her with the language as much as he could understand her. Then her teacher decided to attend a Romani language course to be able to help our children. All of us respected this noble decision. We also had another teacher, who regularly took our children to the playground and worked with them on their physical condition.”

However, there were also parents who expressed uncertainty about preschool. They feared that their children might not be given as much care as they receive home. For other parents it is difficult to take their children to preschool due to their demanding living conditions. In such cases, it is the duty of REYN Slovenia and the other national REYNs to work for and with these parents with the aim of empowering them, gaining their trust, and ensuring adequate conditions to enable them to enrol their children in preschool as early as possible. 

Authors:
Petra Zgonec, Mateja Mlinar
Researchers at the Educational Research Institute, coordinating institution of REYN Slovenia

The Situation of Young Roma Children in Europe – a New Milestone in Early Childhood Research

Although there is a concern for Roma inclusion at the European level, there is a significant knowledge gap about the status of children under the age of six, particularly the youngest. This lack of data impedes the development of responsive policies and programmes to revert their situation. 

To address this issue, Romani Early Years Network (REYN) Initiative is launching the REYN Early Childhood Research, a study that sheds light on young Roma children and their parents throughout Europe. The study brings together unprecedented Roma-related early childhood data from 11 countries. It catalyzes solid evidence for urgent and effective policies and programs enabling each young Roma to reach their full potential – to grow and thrive!  

REYN Early Childhood Research showcases a unique way of conducting research on Roma-related topics. The study, led by Roma researchers, involved Roma and non-Roma country researchers and early childhood experts gathering data in the 11 countries where National REYNs operate.   

The lack of evidence on young Roma children in Europe picturing their status and needs makes the REYN Early Childhood Research a unique piece of evidence reinforcing the importance of early years as well as influencing the agenda of prioritization and investment in young Roma children.  

REYN Early Childhood Research, carried out with the support of the Open Society Foundations, was initiated in 2021 and has been done in partnership with the Roma Studies Groups (CEG) at CREA – University of Barcelona. 

Covering five key areas that impact a child’s development such as health, hygiene and nutrition, safety and security as well as early learning and living environment, the study analyzes structural and emerging issues that might have widened during the COVID-19 crisis, leading to an increase of inequality and social exclusion. 

Country data is already available (see infographics below) and the final report of the study will be launched soon and disseminated via our social media channels (Facebook and Twitter) and REYN newsletter. Stay tuned and subscribe today! 

Photo: Courtesy of Tomáš Rafa


REYN EARLY CHILDHOOD RESEARCH

REYN Early Childhood Research Study

Download

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Download Infographic